Friday, October 10, 2008

Understand the Whole Picture -- Shasta Daisy Flower Essence


Have you ever seen a Shasta Daisy? It's like a large classic daisy with multiple petals radiating out of a golden center.

In the classic young girl's divination games the petals are plucked one by one: "He loves me, he loves me not, he loves me..." Another one from the United States goes "Rich man, poor man, beggar man, thief, merchant, tailor, banker, chief."

Each petal represents a potential manifestation of reality. Supposedly the last petal left at the end of the chant tells the tale.

Whole daisies were also made into chains to wear as garlands or wreaths around one's head. They represented the sun, the earth and the whole of the universe—the circle of life.

Holistic consciousness recognizes that the whole is more than the sum of its parts. By focusing too much on the details of life—the individual petals—we miss the big picture. In divination we're usually trying to get guidance on one small aspect of reality. People rarely think to ask the palm reader or tarot card reader what the big picture holds. They want to know who they will marry, will they be rich, as if who they are and what they think and do has nothing to do with that.

"What is the meaning of this situation in my life?", "how can I live my life in such a way as to manifest the healthiest, happiest life possible?", or even "what can I do to prepare myself to attract a wonderful relationship into my life?" are the kind of questions we like to be asked. It's fine to ask about specific pieces of reality—one's health, one's career, one's relationships—but it's important to understand that we're not individual petals disconnected from the whole and those individual aspects of reality are not unrelated either.

Nine times out of ten when a client wants information about their health (assuming the condition was diagnosed correctly by their doctor), the next question we're guided to ask is "how is your relationship?" or "how do you like your job?" And nine times out of ten the answer to one of those questions is "I'm not too happy about that." We wind up spending the rest of the session looking at these other issues and, frequently, the health concerns unravel themselves.

Shasta Daisy flower essence is used to help a person overly focused on the details of life widen their world view so they can see the overall patterns of the situations they find themselves in, too. It is also recommended for writers, teachers, researchers or for anyone engaged in intellectual pursuits because it helps a person synthesize various ideas into an understandable whole. I use it in my Focused Attention flower essence / aromatherapy perfume.

The illustration for this blog comes from the flower essence self-awareness deck I'm working on. If you like this drawing and would like to have a copy on a journal, mug, greeting cards or t-shirt click here. (The copyright/watermark does not appear on the actual items.)

2 comments:

Rosebud Collection said...

Enjoyed your blog..very interesting read..thanks.

Kala Pohl Studio said...

I love reading your blog - wonderful to find a kindred spirit:) Big hug! Kala